Manifesto for the Right to Housing – Launch 12 June 2014

 

The housing crisis in Ireland is reaching epidemic porportions – there is nothing more debilitating to a human being that to be homeless or in a perpetual state of housing insecurity.

Your life is stalled, you cannot function as a member of society, you cannot interact in any meaningful way with state bodies.
From the Manifesto by Housing Action.

 

“HOUSING FOR ALL
We did not create this housing crisis. We did not vote to increase homelessness.
We did not ratify a treaty that allowed private investors and speculators to push us out of our homes.

We did not give our consent to evictions. We did not choose to throw families out onto the streets.

We did not make a collective call to be ruled by debt. We made no rallying cry to introduce chaos and fear into our housing market.
We participated in no movement that sought to repress the accommodation rights of oppressed minorities.
We did none of this. And yet we are being pushed out of our homes; we are being pushed out of our cities and we are being pushed out of our country. And this makes us ask: does this country belong to speculators and developers whose only concern is their pockets?

Does this country belong to an apathetic government who refuse to protect the unprotected majority, but instead chooses to protect those who profit off our fear? Or does this country belong to the public?
The answer is clear and the solutions are clear-cut. The time for change is now.
We want housing for all.”

Ireland after NAMA

Got us home

Back in March, Taoiseach Enda Kenny made the claim that “If you had 30,000 three- bedroom detached houses in Dublin you’d sell them all in a week. That’s the pent-up demand that’s there”. This has been part of a discourse that seeks to once again talk up the property market; to encourage the construction and sale of houses as a means to both stimulate the economy and to provide housing through the mechanisms of the private market.
The casual slippage back into the development logic of the Celtic Tiger era seeks to ignore both the remaining material evidence of the property crash – in the form of the persistent problems of mortgage arrears, negative equity, and unfinished developments – and the burgeoning housing crisis in the Dublin region.
In short, this strategy seeks to resurrect the property market to the detriment of addressing the housing crisis.
To tackle these…

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